1984 brave new world comparative essay

In 1984, written by George Orwell, the great party leader is the "Big Brother." Big Brother is much more involved in the society than the leader of the Brave New World, "Ford," of Huxley's book, named after the automaker Henry Ford. The main character Winston fears Big Brother and is much more aware of his society than any of the characters in A Brave New World who are constantly ‘pacified’ by soma. In A Brave New World the past is ignored completely whereas in 1984 it is rewritten in order to suit the present.

At the very least, we can assume a posture of civil disobedience, as journalist John Stossel has suggested. The truth is out there, thanks to the Internet and free speech, while we have mostly uncontrolled use of them. If you like this article and are concerned about the future of the Western world, check out Roosh's book Free Speech Isn't Free. It gives an inside look to how the globalist establishment is attempting to marginalize masculine men with a leftist agenda that promotes censorship, feminism, and sterility. It also shares key knowledge and tools that you can use to defend yourself against social justice attacks. Click here to learn more about the book . Your support will help maintain our operation.

Linda is possibly the most unfortunate creature in all of dystopian literature. (Although Winston and the rats in 1984 … that was also pretty bad.) If John was a fun social experiment for the World Controller, Linda is the same for the reader. We get to see how someone very different would fit into our world. Granted, Native Americans on a reservation in New Mexico aren't exactly Huxley's target audience, which means the world into which Linda is thrown isn't exactly our own, but it's a lot closer than the World State. The consequences that Linda faces (repercussions for her promiscuity, a general helplessness, a disgust with anything that hasn't been sterilized, horror at the notion of childbirth) are the same she might suffer if thrown into, say, London in the 1930s. Linda demonstrates that our world and our ideology are completely incompatible with that of Huxley's brave new world. Because of her conditioning, Linda is unable to function as what we might consider a normal human being.

But Linda does overcome her conditioning in one important way: she gives in to her maternal instinct. A little bit, anyway. In John's reminiscence, Linda becomes upset with him, mostly because his existence means she's broken a fundamental rule of society. But as she's about to hit him, she's overcome with… maternal… joy, and ends up hugging and kissing him all over. And for all her sleeping around and name-calling, Linda has loving mothering qualities. She teaches John to read and tells him lullaby-esque stories about the "Other World." All in all, it's not too bad of a job, considering her background. So is this hopeful? Does Linda's case prove that human instinct is stronger than scientific conditioning?

Unfortunately, not really. We're pretty sure Linda's intense soma addiction, rather than her veiled maternal actions, takes the cake in defining her character in Brave New World . Twenty years in a world of harsh reality did nothing at all to teach Linda the value of suffering, family, or long-term human relationships. Apparently, you can take the woman out of the dystopia, but you can't take the dystopia out of the woman.

The reaction of society to the book ranged from acclaim to outrage. Wells, a famous writer of science fiction and dystopian literature, panned the book as alarmist. Other critics challenged Huxley's depictions of religion and ritual as well as his views of sexuality and drug use. The novel's stark depictions of sexuality and cruelty meant that it continues to incite controversy over whether or not it is an appropriate book for all ages and audiences. Nevertheless, as a social critique, Brave New World takes credit with Orwell's 1984 for advancing a new genre of literature that fuses science fiction, political allegory, and literary ambition.

1984 brave new world comparative essay

1984 brave new world comparative essay

The reaction of society to the book ranged from acclaim to outrage. . Wells, a famous writer of science fiction and dystopian literature, panned the book as alarmist. Other critics challenged Huxley's depictions of religion and ritual as well as his views of sexuality and drug use. The novel's stark depictions of sexuality and cruelty meant that it continues to incite controversy over whether or not it is an appropriate book for all ages and audiences. Nevertheless, as a social critique, Brave New World takes credit with Orwell's 1984 for advancing a new genre of literature that fuses science fiction, political allegory, and literary ambition.

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