Essays on the dead by james joyce

That is the actress Prunella Scales answering a question of comic (and class) motivation that had troubled my father for twenty years: why on earth did they marry each other? A question that — given his own late, failed marriage to a Jamaican girl less than half his age — must have had a resonance beyond the laugh track. On finally hearing an answer, he gave a sigh of comedy-snob satisfaction. Not long after my visit, Harvey died, at the age of eighty-one. He had told me that he wanted "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" played at his funeral. When the day came, I managed to remember that.

Because of an editing error, an obituary in some copies on Friday about the writer Christopher Hitchens referred incorrectly to the circumstances of his death. While he did die at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, he had not entered hospice care there, and he had not stopped treatment. The obituary also misstated the source of a remark by Mr. Hitchens, an avowed atheist, about the possibility of a deathbed conversion. It came from a 2010 interview with The Atlantic, not with The New York Times. And the obituary also misstated the frequency of “Minority Report,” the column Mr. Hitchens wrote for The Nation. It appeared biweekly, not bimonthly.

Essays on the dead by james joyce

essays on the dead by james joyce

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