Left-handedness research paper

Adam Hadhazy is a contributing writer for Live Science and . He often writes about physics, psychology, animal behavior and story topics in general that explore the blurring line between today's science fiction and tomorrow's science fact. Adam has a Master of Arts degree from the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Boston College. When not squeezing in reruns of Star Trek, Adam likes hurling a Frisbee or dining on spicy food. You can check out more of his work at .

Kangaroos and other macropod marsupials have a left-hand preference for everyday tasks in the wild. ‘True’ handedness is unexpected in marsupials because, unlike placental mammals , they lack a corpus callosum . Left-handedness was particularly apparent in the red kangaroo ( Macropus rufus ) and the eastern gray kangaroo ( Macropus giganteus ). Red-necked (Bennett’s) wallabies ( Macropus rufogriseus ) preferentially use their left hand for behaviours that involve fine manipulation, but the right for behaviours that require more physical strength. There was less evidence for handedness in arboreal species. [75] Studies of dogs, horses, and domestic cats have shown that females of those species tend to be right-handed, while males are lefties. [76]

Have you ever chatted with your right-handed friends about being left-handed and that they scoff and say that they are completely right-handed? Well, you may be able to prove that they are less right-handed than they think. We have some fun tests and games that you could try with them to show that there are varying degrees of handedness.

It is only the dominance of one side of the brain that decides which side of the body you prefer to use. However, as we still have to use all the brain to fully control our bodies, we use the other side more than we think.

Get together with a group of friends and have a go at the following exercises. Remember that each task must be carried out instantly and without thinking about it.

Action : For reduced risk of schizophrenia, a mother may want to make sure that she gets at least double the recommended dose of vitamin D on a regular basis before and during pregnancy. In a recent study on vitamin D deficiency in mothers during pregnanc y, Dr. Lisa Badner stated "While many prenatal vitamins contain about 400 international units (iu) of vitamin D, taking perhaps 1,000 units might be preferable". Vitamin D can be bought as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement, or it may be included in store-bought milk and orange juice (check the carton).

Left-handedness research paper

left-handedness research paper

Action : For reduced risk of schizophrenia, a mother may want to make sure that she gets at least double the recommended dose of vitamin D on a regular basis before and during pregnancy. In a recent study on vitamin D deficiency in mothers during pregnanc y, Dr. Lisa Badner stated "While many prenatal vitamins contain about 400 international units (iu) of vitamin D, taking perhaps 1,000 units might be preferable". Vitamin D can be bought as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement, or it may be included in store-bought milk and orange juice (check the carton).

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